Chasing Chiles

Archive for the ‘About the Book’ Category

About the Book,Chiles,Images

March 17, 2011

Chasing Chiles Across North America : Gary Nabhan

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Chasing Chiles is both a rollicking travelogue from three guys on the hunt for authentic food and cultural experience and an adventure with a larger, sobering mission: to understand the effects of climate change by zeroing in on one critical crop and the people whose lives are most deeply intertwined with it. Kraft, Friese, and Nabhan seek out and listen to farmers, chefs, and others who rely on the chile, and document their struggle to protect local foods and livelihoods in the face of unpredictable weather, decreased biodiversity, and sporadic availability.

 

 

Courtesy: Gary Paul Nabhan

Over a year-long journey, three pepper-loving gastronauts—an agroecologist, a chef, and an ethnobotanist—set out to find the real stories of America’s rarest heirloom chile varieties, and learn about the changing climate from farmers and other people who live by the pepper, and who, lately, have been adapting to shifting growing conditions and weather patterns. They put a face on an issue that has been made far too abstract for our own good.

Chasing Chiles is not your archetypal book about climate change, with facts and computer models delivered by a distant narrator. On the contrary, these three dedicated chileheads look and listen, sit down to eat, and get stories and recipes from on the ground—in farmers’ fields, local cafes, and the desert-scrub hillsides across North America. From the Sonoran Desert to Santa Fe and St. Augustine the two oldest cities in the US, from the marshes of Avery Island in Cajun Louisiana to the thin limestone soils of the Yucatan, this book looks at how and why climate change will continue to affect our palates and our producers, and how it already has.

via Chasing Chiles Across North America : Gary Nabhan.

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About the Authors,About the Book,News

March 5, 2011

A rollicking quest for chiles ‘Along The Pepper Trail’ – The Santa Fe New Mexican

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Everyone loves a book that has a good quest at its center, be it a great white whale, a holy grail or, in the case of ethnobotanist Gary Nabhan, chef Kurt Friese, and agro-ecologist Kraig Kraft, rare and heirloom chiles.Their new book, Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots Along The Pepper Trail Chelsea Green Publishing, 2011, is a rollicking ride, a “spice odyssey” that begins in Mexico and continues through several places in America where chile peppers are an integral part of the culture. The trio is passionate about its pursuit and, in the grand old tradition of a road-trip story, the book is chock-full of recipes, humorous adventures, chile lore and, most importantly, sobering statistics on the effects of climate change on food and agriculture.

via A rollicking quest for chiles ‘Along The Pepper Trail’ – The Santa Fe New Mexican.

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About the Book,Excerpt,Recipes

February 23, 2011

First Excerpt Published in Edible Phoenix Magazine

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An excerpt from Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail by Kurt Michael Friese, Kraig Kraft and Gary Paul Nabhan, Chelsea Green Publishing, March 2011.

When we crossed the US–Mexico border into the estado de Sonora, we could feel something different in the landscape. It was especially visible along the roadsides, a feeling that was palpable in the dusty air. Less than half an hour south of Nogales, Arizona, we began to see dozens of street vendors on the edge of the highway, hawking their wares. There were fruit stands, ceviche and fish tacos in seafood carts, tin-roofed barbacoa huts, and all sorts of garish concrete and soapstone lawn ornaments clumped together. Amid all the runof-the-mill street food and tourist kitsch, we sensed that we might just discover something truly Sonoran.

Dozens of long strings of dried crimson peppers called chiles de sarta hung from the beams of the roadside stands, ready for making moles and enchilada sauces. Hidden among them were “recycled” containers used to harbor smaller but more potent peppers: old Coronita beer bottles and the familiar curvy Coca-Cola silhouette filled with homemade pickled wild green chiltepines. These were what we sought—little incendiary wild chiles, stuffed into old bottles like a chile Molotov cocktail and sold on the street.

via FINDING THE WILDNESS OF CHILES IN SONORA | Spring 2011.

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About the Book,Climate Change,News

February 10, 2011

Gary’s op-ed piece in the Santa Fe New Mexican

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Gary speaks up in the Santa Fe New Mexican about food security in the West.

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Whether you’ve noticed it or not, the farming capacity and food security of the border states are at an all-time low, and are likely to get worse before they are fully transformed to more sustainable and cost-efficient systems.

via Food security at historic watershed – The Santa Fe New Mexican.

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About the Book,Cover,Images

January 7, 2011

NEW Chasing Chiles Cover Released

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Here’s the new and improved version of the book cover.  We hear it may yet get tweaked a little bit, but we’ll see when the real thing hits shelves starting in March.

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About the Book,Chelsea Green,Chiles,Cover,Images

December 21, 2010

The Cover is Released

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Your one and only chance to judge the book by its cover (or what we think will be the cover – it may yet get tweaked a little), after this we do ask that you go ahead and read the book before passing judgment.

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About the Authors,About the Book,Advance Praise,Chelsea Green

December 12, 2010

Chasing Chiles Publisher Page

Chasing Chiles
Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail

by Kurt Michael Friese, Kraig Kraft, Gary Nabhan

“An instant classic of chile pepper lore, Chasing Chiles is the best social history of chiles since Amal Naj’s Peppers from 1992. In fact, I think it’s better—because it’s not just journalism; it has fascinating science and entertaining humor as well. Highly recommended!”

Dave DeWitt, “The Pope of Peppers” and coauthor of The Complete Chile Pepper Book

Chasing Chiles looks at both the future of place-based foods and the effects of climate change on agriculture through the lens of the chile pepper—from the farmers who cultivate this iconic crop to the cuisines and cultural traditions in which peppers play a huge role.

Why chile peppers? Both a spice and a vegetable, chile peppers have captivated imaginations and taste buds for thousands of years. Native to Mesoamerica and the New World, chiles are currently grown on every continent, since their relatively recent introduction to Europe (in the early 1500s via Christopher Columbus). Chiles are delicious, dynamic, and very diverse—they have been rapidly adopted, adapted, and assimilated into numerous world cuisines, and while malleable to a degree, certain heirloom varieties

Read more: Chasing Chiles by Kurt Michael Friese, Kraig Kraft, Gary Nabhan – Chelsea Green.

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